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20121224
20121224
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delivery issues in several states, including iowa, michigan, wisconsin, and nebraska. it also says contingency plans are in place. we didn't see service advisories on u.p.s.'s website or the postal service website. what's adding to this is really that surge in online shopping i just told you about. it's got a direct impact on the shipping business. these shippers, they just had a huge increase in volume this holiday season, and some of the biggest single days ever. listen to this. u.p.s. says it made 28 million deliveries just last thursday. fedex says it moved 19 million packages on its busiest day. even the postal service says it moved a whopping 658 pieces of mail on december 17th. the weather is complicating issues. packages may arrive late in some places. carol? >> you're right about that. i mailed some packages last thursday, and u.p.s. told me i had a 50-50 chance of them getting there by christmas day. i'm keeping my fingers crossed. >> fingers crossed. >> alison kosik, thank you. >>> we have to talk politics. with the president and congress spending christmas away from was
century, we've built an amazing network. we built canals like the erie and illinois and michigan canals, railroads atticaals, and cities grew up. at buffalo, the western terminus of the erie canal. the oldest cities were typically where the river meets the sea, like boston and new york, but every one of america's 20 largest cities was on a major waterway. chicago was a future that was made it the linchpin of a watery arc that went from new york to new orleans. and industries grew up around these transportation hubs. chicago's most famous is, of course, its stockyards, and that's what you're looking at right now. those stockyards were part of the problem of getting the corn that america grows so well then and now, and it would each without utterly beknighted agricultural policies followed by until federal government with subsidizing -- that was a pleatly unnecessary aside -- completely unnecessary aside, i apologize for that. [laughter] originally, it was moved over vast distances in that quite tasty form of whiskey. we then moved to pigs which are, of course, corn with feet -- [laughter
. that is not a problem. [laughter] water flouration is something that was invented in 1945, grand rapids, michigan. it is seen as one of the best public health triumphs because people who cannot go to the depptist, people who are poor -- dentist, people who are poor can at least get some flour i'd in their -- flour ride in their water. it's a great thing. 200 million americans get flour dated water. portland rejected this in 1980, and oregon subsequently ranked near the bottom in children's dental health. many portlanders treasure their city's quirk ri distinctiveness, said "the new york times," and i agree -- [laughter] being toothless is quirk ri and distinctive. and, basically, i'm not going to read this quote from "the new york times"esing but basically, a couple weeks ago the city counsel finally approved fluoridation to begin in 201. really, a round of applause for portland for joining the 20th century. i love portland. if you're going to san francisco, be sure the bring a plunger. low-flow toilets -- not san francisco's fault, actually signed into law by president george h.w. bush, bush 41
pension costs for government employees. michigan passing a right to work law so you don't have to join a union in one of the most unionized states anywhere and demise of twinkies when a bakers union refused to accept any concessions at all on retirement costs. it is always money at heart of the these disputes and unions seem to be getting harder and harder edged about this. let's remember unions represent less than 7% of the private workforce in this nation. they represent 40% of the government workers. here we've got a private union strike that could happen starting this coming sunday t could be crippling. which means they will sell it fast. heather: neither said no to renewing talks. the national trade associations, they have even appealed to president obama use the taft-hartley injunction to hold off this strike for 80 days. >> reporter: right. to force them to get back to the table and negotiate. you have to wonder how this will turn out. i wish them luck on both sides. heather: thank you so much, dennis. >> reporter: thank you, heather the. gregg: snow, rain, freezing drizzle maki
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4